My way of reading movies.

My first go around at college I had a roommate who was a undergrad film student at UT. Prior to living with her I never really looked at movies abstractly. Meaning in my opinion I never thought about why a film made me feel, think a certain way or empathize. Through conversations we had in front of the TV, I gained a little perspective regarding that aspect of films. After reading Mr. Eberts how to read a movie, I performed his “Cinema Interpretus” method to a Quentin Tarantino film (Kill Bill). Here is what I took from the clip and the re-viewing of that film:

1. From below: In my opinion I think he does a lot of pointless shots, cinematography wise. But I do not think his from below technique is one of them. Shooting from below is used primarily to give perspective from the person or thing that the subject is looking on or at. In most cases with Tarantino it is a victim looking up at an oppressor. It gives the viewer a sense of empathy or pity, because in some ways they can somewhat put themselves in that subjects position. Which is helped greatly by the angle of the shot. On a side not I thought Kill Bill was overdone. Also the fact that he “bleeped” the main characters name the whole movie was silly in my opinion. Good plot, and great character development though.

2. The Shining (zooms): I noticed that all of the zooms are very deliberate and slow. They were centered around capturing a feeling or emotion from the subjects face. They all start off from afar or close up and moves away or closer. I didn’t come across one that started from a medium distance. Kubrick made iconic cinematic scenes with this technique. The “here’s Johnny” scene stands out the most, and countless poster-ized scenes of the children in the hall.

3. Kubrick: (one point perspective): I enjoyed this clip the most. It focused on drawing the eye tot he center of the screen. Everything else in the shot, though it mattered, played a supportive role around the focus. The only film I recognized in the sequence of clips was “the Shining”. Looking back on what i can recall of that film, is that this perspective made things seem bigger, longer, wider, grander etc. than they were. It made the dining room seem like a banquet hall, the hall to be a mile long an the ceilings to be taller than normal. Overall I think this shot trick makes things larger than life, or just overwhelming in general.

 

LJ

 

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